What's New

The Life of a Friend and Coworker Celebrated

01/31/2017
Shonna Soria
Today we celebrate the life and service of our co-worker, Barbara Anspaugh.

Applicant Season

10/12/2016
Dr. Jenna Geohagan, PGY 2
This time of year makes me reminisce on the excitement and accompanying stress that surrounds trying to figure out which program suits your educational, family, and overall life needs. Therefore, I wanted to highlight three of my favorite aspects of the Great Plains Family Medicine Residency Program, so applicants have a better idea of who we are as a residency program.

An Update from the Director

09/14/2015
Neal Clemenson, MD

Integris Metro United Way Campaign - Wacky Bed Races!

09/09/2015
Michelle Wallace
The faculty, residents, and staff at Great Plains came out to support the United Way Wacky Bed Races by entering two teams and they tied for 4th place!!

Integrated behavioral health services

10/21/2014
Grace Wilson PhD
Nationwide, there is a movement towards collaborative medicine and integrated behavioral health services.


Applicant Season

Posted by Dr. Jenna Geohagan, PGY 2 on 10/12/2016

Fall has arrived, which means it is finally time for football, hot apple cider, holidays, and of course, another round of residency interviews. This time of year makes me reminisce on the excitement and accompanying stress that surrounds trying to figure out which program suits your educational, family, and overall life needs. Therefore, I wanted to highlight three of my favorite aspects of the Great Plains Family Medicine Residency Program, so applicants have a better idea of who we are as a residency program. I have also asked our new interns to contribute their thoughts on what has been the most surprising/unexpected part of intern year, which are written below.

The Great Plains learning environment is unmatched. Our faculty, especially our Behaviorist Dr. Grace Wilson, make an effort to ensure the overall wellbeing of residents starting from day one of intern year. They make sure we are taking excellent care of our patients as well as ourselves throughout the process. There is a healthy mixture of humor and intense learning in our curriculum. Residents also receive high quality instruction from attendings trained in Sports Medicine, Geriatrics, and Obstetrics. 

The small resident class size provides a family-like atmosphere within the workplace. Especially within individual classes, residents grow to know each other very well and this transitions into a fun and productive work environment. This workplace dynamic makes all the difference in the world when you need assistance from a peer at 3:00 AM!

Great Plains is truly family oriented. Many of our residents are married, pregnant, or may already have multiple children (up to eight) at home, so we structure our extracurricular events to include everyone. We strongly encourage participation in our yearly Halloween costume contest, and we have potlucks for multiple holidays and celebrations throughout the year. Community engagement is also encouraged through participation in the annual United Way Wacky Bed Races, which includes racing hospital beds around a course while racers are decked out in their best costume. We know how to have a good time and are excited for you to join us on this journey!

 Intern Interviews - What has been most surprising or unexpected part of intern year?

Dr. Ross Sheline: As always, making the leap from medical student to resident left me with concerns and anxiety. But, the progress and the support around me has made this transition as painless as could have been hoped for and has given me the confidence I need to continue.

Dr. Tyler Freeman: I didn't expect to get to jump into practicing medicine so quickly, or that I would feel so well prepared and encouraged. From admitting patients to delivering babies and placing central lines, I hit the ground running.

Dr. Senushi O'Sullivan: I'm a real doctor, so I'm treated like one! It seems obvious, but the responsibilities are very real and matter so much. Intern year is just as difficult as everyone says it is, but it is really fulfilling to know that your work truly matters.

Dr. David de Gaston: The transition from medical school to residency is abrupt. There is no asterisk next to the MD credentials on the white lab coat to warn patients that the intern seeing them is a newly graduated doctor just starting residency training. Only looking back do I see how well medical school prepared me to move into this new role with increased patient care responsibility.

Dr. Caleb Janosz: I was surprised that we are treated like doctors and not "just the intern." We always have support and backup from the upper levels. When the plan is presented or a consult needs called, I take care of it. We are the doctor for our patients.